Kuala Lumpur Attractions | Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur – Museum Kesenian Islam

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur is the region’s first museum dedicated solely to Islamic art. This brilliant Malaysian-designed building reflects the elegance of Islamic architecture.

The most striking feature is the five domes. You can view four of the domes from the exterior, however, the fifth dome which has unique inverted design, can only be viewed from inside the building. This Kuala Lumpur museum houses up to 6,000 artifacts including samples of Islamic metalwork and ceramics.

There are also a children’s library, a museum shop, a Moroccan-styled Dome’s cafe and an auditorium. The Museum Shop which is located on the Ground Floor, offers you a unique selection of books and artifacts from all around the world.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

For children, there is a special section which features books, puzzles and other educational material.

You will notice that the exhibition space of the Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur differs from most museums as the galleries are housed in a vast open area. The elimination of spatial division allows your uninterrupted movements from one exhibition space to the next, inspiring a sense of continuity embodied in the Islamic spirit.

The Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur has two floors of permanent galleries, and two special galleries for temporary exhibitions.

Islamic Arts Museum Galleries

The permanent galleries are categorised by artifact material or field of study. Located on level 3 of the Kuala Lumpur museum are some exceptions — the India Gallery, China Gallery and Malay World Gallery.

These three galleries serve as representations of the diversity of Islamic peoples and the multi-cultural heritage of Malaysia. Also located on level 3 are the Architecture Gallery, the Qurans & Manuscripts Gallery and the Ottoman Room – a reconstructed interior of an Ottoman Syrian room dated 1820 – 1821 AD, sponsored by Standard Chartered Bank.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

On level 4 of the Islamic Arts Museum, you will find the Ceramics & Glass Gallery, Metalwork Gallery, Woodwork Gallery, Arms & Armour Gallery, Jewellery Gallery and Textiles Gallery. The exhibits collections are displayed thematically, according to chronology, region or technique of production.

Architecture

Architecture was one of the earliest expressions of Islamic cultural identity and has retained its importance ever since. Conveying the splendour of this monumental art form in a museum setting has been achieved by using a comprehensive collection of scale models.

You can admire the pieces from the colossal grandeur of the holiest mosque in Islam (Mecca’s Masjid al-Haram) to the more desolate beauty of Central Asian mausoleums dedicated to Timur and Amir Albukhari. Every corner of Islam is covered in miniature, including the widely overlooked mosques of China and Southeast Asia. To give you a more intimate impression of these sacred spaces, the gallery includes a re-creation of a mosque interior.

Quran & Manuscript

The oldest fragments of the Qur’an are from the 8th century. Their origins are usually unclear, but they are usually attributed to North Africa or the Middle East.

The power of their simplicity is self-evident. From around the 11th century onwards, paper took over from the original vellum. Decoration went from the minimalism of early Kufic to later examples adorned with enough gold and colour to overwhelm the words completely.

India

The Islamic Arts Museum India Gallery provides a glimpse into the worlds of the Mughals. They took as much interest in fashion as jewellery, and their architectural achievements remain unrivalled.

China

Calligraphy has always been a respected art form in China. This coincides with the Islamic ideal, although the results are often very different from other parts of Islam.

The most distinctive works are calligraphic scrolls that take a traditional, Chinese approach.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

It’s interesting to note that the written word is found in many other Chinese Islamic media. These include the cloisonné wares that China started to create during the 15th century.

The rich colours of the enamels make a vivid contrast to plain calligraphic belief. You will find the same blending of cultures evident in bronze altar vessels, originally made for traditional worship and then adapted to suit the tastes of Muslim patrons.

Malay World

The Malay Archipelago has been the most easterly frontier of Islam for the past 500 years. For centuries, Southeast Asia was part of the greatest trading route the world had ever seen.

It was a meeting place for different Asian empires, as well as the new trading powers that emerged from the West.

The Islamic Arts Museum Malay World gallery shows the natural forms abound in the Islamic art of Southeast Asia. Subjects such as stylised plants, fruits and clouds are found in a wide variety of media.

On textiles, these are often taken to a degree of abstraction that puts them in the realm of pure geometry. Craftsmanship in wood and metal, especially the creation of kris daggers, is another tradition for which the Malay world was once renowned.

Jewellery

Just as many of the world’s finest gemstones come from Islamic lands, so does much of the finest jewellery. The elite of various Islamic societies have generally favoured diamonds, emeralds and rubies, along with pearls and a host of semi-precious stones.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

The ways that they were worked, and the uses that they were put to, often differed greatly from their European counterparts. Islamic jewellery falls into two broad categories: the exclusive and the ‘ethnic’. Examples of the latter exist among tribal groupings from Morocco to Xinjiang.

Textiles

Islamic textiles were once used to convey status, wealth and religious allegiance. The Safavids and Mughals were responsible for some of the greatest advances in islamic textiles.

Elaborate woven silks and brilliant colourfast dyes for cottons were hugely popular.

Arms & Armor

Many cultures have put considerable effort into beautifying the arts of war, but in the Islamic world there is a spiritual dimension as well. Religious inscriptions abound.

In addition to sophisticated acid-etching techniques and inlays in precious metals, the superb quality of steel with a high-carbon blend was allowed to shine through swords, daggers, axes, maces and spears. Collected for centuries as weapons, and much respected by their opponents in warfare, these objects stand out as works with a sculptural quality.

Coins

Up to the modern age, coins throughout the Islamic world shared a certain identity. They were highly calligraphic, with religious inscriptions and details of rulers predominating.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

Pictorial images have been avoided since early in the development of Islam, although exceptions do exist. As an empire with a keen interest in trade, coins of the Caliphate were distributed around the world. They were imitated as far away as Anglo-Saxon England and discoveries of Umayyad and Abbasid coin hoards happen regularly in Sweden and Russia.

Metalwork

Most of the Islamic metalwork that has survived is made of base alloys, although it is clear that these were items of great importance in their own time.

Works in brass and bronze reveal a picture of metalworkers gifted with enormous ingenuity and technical ability. Many artifacts were signed by their makers, suggesting that they were objects of considerable prestige.

Ceramics

Muslim potters have created wares of outstanding originality. Influences came from many directions, mainly China, but the results are unique to the cultures that produced them.

From the austerity of Nishaphur calligraphic bowls to the richness of Kashan lustrewares, there is an unmistakable vigour that puts these works in a special creative category.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

The Islamic Arts Museum Ceramic gallery exposes that calligraphic inscriptions were used to enormous effect in a number of different techniques. Technical innovations allowed for new body types, many of which depended on the composite material known as ‘frit’.

The Ottoman Empire’s great contribution is Iznik ceramics. These relied little on calligraphy and a lot on bold floral designs. After the early blue-and-white decoration of the 15th century, the next two hundred years saw the arrival of flowers and other motifs in vivid colours that have never been matched.

Living With Woods

The Islamic Arts Museum Living With Woods section shows that carving artifacts have always been a much-admired form of decoration throughout the Islamic world. Craftsmen lavished special care on wood, which in many areas was very scarce.

In addition to a shortage of timber, woodworkers have often operated in climates that cause warping and shrinkage. They developed an unrivalled expertise, combining different types of wood with other precious materials, including ivory and mother-of-pearl.

When to Visit the Islamic Arts Museum?

The Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur is open from 10.00am to 6.00pm on Tuesday to Sunday, including most public holidays. It is closed on Mondays.

Admission fee is RM12 for adults and RM6 for children over 6 years old. No fee is charged for entry to other facilities such as the museum shop, restaurant, café, children’s library and art workshop. There are also ample free parkings.

Islamic Arts Museum Map & Location

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur is the region’s first museum dedicated solely to Islamic art. This brilliant Malaysian-designed building reflects the elegance of Islamic architecture.

The most striking feature is the five domes. You can view four of the domes from the exterior, however, the fifth dome which has unique inverted design, can only be viewed from inside the building. This Kuala Lumpur museum houses up to 6,000 artifacts including samples of Islamic metalwork and ceramics.

There are also a children’s library, a museum shop, a Moroccan-styled Dome’s cafe and an auditorium. The Museum Shop which is located on the Ground Floor, offers you a unique selection of books and artifacts from all around the world.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

For children, there is a special section which features books, puzzles and other educational material.

You will notice that the exhibition space of the Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur differs from most museums as the galleries are housed in a vast open area. The elimination of spatial division allows your uninterrupted movements from one exhibition space to the next, inspiring a sense of continuity embodied in the Islamic spirit.

The Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur has two floors of permanent galleries, and two special galleries for temporary exhibitions.

Islamic Arts Museum Galleries

The permanent galleries are categorised by artifact material or field of study. Located on level 3 of the Kuala Lumpur museum are some exceptions — the India Gallery, China Gallery and Malay World Gallery.

These three galleries serve as representations of the diversity of Islamic peoples and the multi-cultural heritage of Malaysia. Also located on level 3 are the Architecture Gallery, the Qurans & Manuscripts Gallery and the Ottoman Room – a reconstructed interior of an Ottoman Syrian room dated 1820 – 1821 AD, sponsored by Standard Chartered Bank.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

On level 4 of the Islamic Arts Museum, you will find the Ceramics & Glass Gallery, Metalwork Gallery, Woodwork Gallery, Arms & Armour Gallery, Jewellery Gallery and Textiles Gallery. The exhibits collections are displayed thematically, according to chronology, region or technique of production.

Architecture

Architecture was one of the earliest expressions of Islamic cultural identity and has retained its importance ever since. Conveying the splendour of this monumental art form in a museum setting has been achieved by using a comprehensive collection of scale models.

You can admire the pieces from the colossal grandeur of the holiest mosque in Islam (Mecca’s Masjid al-Haram) to the more desolate beauty of Central Asian mausoleums dedicated to Timur and Amir Albukhari. Every corner of Islam is covered in miniature, including the widely overlooked mosques of China and Southeast Asia. To give you a more intimate impression of these sacred spaces, the gallery includes a re-creation of a mosque interior.

Quran & Manuscript

The oldest fragments of the Qur’an are from the 8th century. Their origins are usually unclear, but they are usually attributed to North Africa or the Middle East.

The power of their simplicity is self-evident. From around the 11th century onwards, paper took over from the original vellum. Decoration went from the minimalism of early Kufic to later examples adorned with enough gold and colour to overwhelm the words completely.

India

The Islamic Arts Museum India Gallery provides a glimpse into the worlds of the Mughals. They took as much interest in fashion as jewellery, and their architectural achievements remain unrivalled.

China

Calligraphy has always been a respected art form in China. This coincides with the Islamic ideal, although the results are often very different from other parts of Islam.

The most distinctive works are calligraphic scrolls that take a traditional, Chinese approach.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

It’s interesting to note that the written word is found in many other Chinese Islamic media. These include the cloisonné wares that China started to create during the 15th century.

The rich colours of the enamels make a vivid contrast to plain calligraphic belief. You will find the same blending of cultures evident in bronze altar vessels, originally made for traditional worship and then adapted to suit the tastes of Muslim patrons.

Malay World

The Malay Archipelago has been the most easterly frontier of Islam for the past 500 years. For centuries, Southeast Asia was part of the greatest trading route the world had ever seen.

It was a meeting place for different Asian empires, as well as the new trading powers that emerged from the West.

The Islamic Arts Museum Malay World gallery shows the natural forms abound in the Islamic art of Southeast Asia. Subjects such as stylised plants, fruits and clouds are found in a wide variety of media.

On textiles, these are often taken to a degree of abstraction that puts them in the realm of pure geometry. Craftsmanship in wood and metal, especially the creation of kris daggers, is another tradition for which the Malay world was once renowned.

Jewellery

Just as many of the world’s finest gemstones come from Islamic lands, so does much of the finest jewellery. The elite of various Islamic societies have generally favoured diamonds, emeralds and rubies, along with pearls and a host of semi-precious stones.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

The ways that they were worked, and the uses that they were put to, often differed greatly from their European counterparts. Islamic jewellery falls into two broad categories: the exclusive and the ‘ethnic’. Examples of the latter exist among tribal groupings from Morocco to Xinjiang.

Textiles

Islamic textiles were once used to convey status, wealth and religious allegiance. The Safavids and Mughals were responsible for some of the greatest advances in islamic textiles.

Elaborate woven silks and brilliant colourfast dyes for cottons were hugely popular.

Arms & Armor

Many cultures have put considerable effort into beautifying the arts of war, but in the Islamic world there is a spiritual dimension as well. Religious inscriptions abound.

In addition to sophisticated acid-etching techniques and inlays in precious metals, the superb quality of steel with a high-carbon blend was allowed to shine through swords, daggers, axes, maces and spears. Collected for centuries as weapons, and much respected by their opponents in warfare, these objects stand out as works with a sculptural quality.

Coins

Up to the modern age, coins throughout the Islamic world shared a certain identity. They were highly calligraphic, with religious inscriptions and details of rulers predominating.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

Pictorial images have been avoided since early in the development of Islam, although exceptions do exist. As an empire with a keen interest in trade, coins of the Caliphate were distributed around the world. They were imitated as far away as Anglo-Saxon England and discoveries of Umayyad and Abbasid coin hoards happen regularly in Sweden and Russia.

Metalwork

Most of the Islamic metalwork that has survived is made of base alloys, although it is clear that these were items of great importance in their own time.

Works in brass and bronze reveal a picture of metalworkers gifted with enormous ingenuity and technical ability. Many artifacts were signed by their makers, suggesting that they were objects of considerable prestige.

Ceramics

Muslim potters have created wares of outstanding originality. Influences came from many directions, mainly China, but the results are unique to the cultures that produced them.

From the austerity of Nishaphur calligraphic bowls to the richness of Kashan lustrewares, there is an unmistakable vigour that puts these works in a special creative category.

Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur

The Islamic Arts Museum Ceramic gallery exposes that calligraphic inscriptions were used to enormous effect in a number of different techniques. Technical innovations allowed for new body types, many of which depended on the composite material known as ‘frit’.

The Ottoman Empire’s great contribution is Iznik ceramics. These relied little on calligraphy and a lot on bold floral designs. After the early blue-and-white decoration of the 15th century, the next two hundred years saw the arrival of flowers and other motifs in vivid colours that have never been matched.

Living With Woods

The Islamic Arts Museum Living With Woods section shows that carving artifacts have always been a much-admired form of decoration throughout the Islamic world. Craftsmen lavished special care on wood, which in many areas was very scarce.

In addition to a shortage of timber, woodworkers have often operated in climates that cause warping and shrinkage. They developed an unrivalled expertise, combining different types of wood with other precious materials, including ivory and mother-of-pearl.

When to Visit the Islamic Arts Museum?

The Islamic Arts Museum Kuala Lumpur is open from 10.00am to 6.00pm on Tuesday to Sunday, including most public holidays. It is closed on Mondays.

Admission fee is RM12 for adults and RM6 for children over 6 years old. No fee is charged for entry to other facilities such as the museum shop, restaurant, café, children’s library and art workshop. There are also ample free parkings.

Islamic Arts Museum Map & Location


Forever Living Malaysia
RenoSkin
RENOSKIN MEDIC SERUM

Agen RenoSkin modal mula serendah RM440 sahaja untuk 10x botol RenoSkin Medic Serum. Sila isi borang di BORANG AGEN RENOSKIN. Agen RenoSkin bawah Team Cikros ada banyak kelebihan seperti promosi percuma, hadiah insentif, support group, koleksi testimoni dan teknik marketing online (advance)!

Tiada modal? Pun boleh jual RenoSkin Medic Serum! Dropship RenoSkin tak perlu modal & tak payah simpan stok. Anda hanya cari customer & Cikros uruskan delivery. Sila isi borang di BORANG DROPSHIP RENOSKIN. Dropship RenoSkin bawah Team Cikros dapat kelebihan seperti support group, testimoni dan teknik marketing online (basic).

Saya akan hubungi anda secepat mungkin! Jom jadi agen RenoSkin untuk sebarkan manfaatnya kepada mereka yang sangat memerlukannya. Utamakan niat untuk bantu orang lain barulah rezeki anda datang bergolek. Semoga anda dan saya dimurahkan rezeki bersama famili RenoSkin. Ameen.